Makeup-free Naomi Watts looks stylish in a corduroy jacket and chic glasses

She was just cast in Ryan Murphy’s hit anthology series Feud.

And Naomi Watts looked busy on a call as she took her beloved rescue dog Izzy for a walk in New York’s trendy Tribeca neighborhood on Tuesday.

The 53-year-old was smartly dressed in a beige corduroy jacket paired with a cream wool sweater and designer jeans.

Busy in the Big Apple! Naomi Watts looked busy on a work call as she took her beloved rescue dog Izzy for a walk in New York’s trendy Tribeca neighborhood on Tuesday

She accessorized with chic black-rimmed glasses and wore beige boots to match the feet.

Without makeup, the Mulholland Drive actress pulled her blonde locks back into a ponytail.

Casual chic: The 53-year-old was smartly dressed in a beige corduroy jacket paired with a cream wool sweater and designer jeans

Casual chic: The 53-year-old was smartly dressed in a beige corduroy jacket paired with a cream wool sweater and designer jeans

Following the success of FEUD: Bette and Joan on FX, a new project has been greenlit titled Capote’s Women, where Watts is set to star as American socialite Babe Paley, according to Deadline.

Paley – a friend of Truman Capote – ruled the glamorous world of New York society in the 1960s and 1970s.

Two-time Oscar-nominated director Gus Van Sant will direct all eight episodes of the series, with Pulitzer-nominated writer Jon Robin Baitz serving as showrunner and writing all eight episodes.

Naomi joins Ryan Murphy's latest Feud miniseries playing American socialite Babe Paley... in a drama about Truman Capote's girlfriends known as

Subject: Babe Paley - a friend of Truman Capote - ruled the glamorous world of New York society in the 1960s and 1970s

New role: Naomi recently signed on for Ryan Murphy’s latest Feud miniseries playing American socialite Babe Paley… in a drama about Truman Capote’s girlfriends known as ‘Swans’

The project is an adaptation of a bestselling book by Laurence Leamer titled Capote’s Women: A True Story of Love, Betrayal, and a Swan Song for an Era.

The miniseries will be set in the 1970s and will end with the death of Truman Capote in 1984.

The drama follows the lives of his elegant and stylish high-society wives – nicknamed his “swans” – which included Jackie Kennedy’s sister Lee Radziwill, Andy Warhol’s muse CZ Guest, and Babe Paley.

It is not yet known what other historical figures will be portrayed in the series.

In Good Hands: Watts will be directed by two-time Oscar-nominated director Gus Van Sant (Watts pictured above last month)

In Good Hands: Watts will be directed by two-time Oscar-nominated director Gus Van Sant (Watts pictured above last month)

Capote’s popularity with New York socialites is perhaps unsurprising given that he has been hailed as one of the most cutting-edge writers of the 20th century.

His 1958 novel Breakfast At Tiffany’s was adapted into the Oscar-winning film starring Audrey Hepburn, while his 1966 true “non-fiction novel” In Cold Blood is often considered one of the greatest examples of the genre.

Babe Paley represented a third of the Cushing sisters – alongside siblings Minnie and Betsey – whose romances, style trends and parties captivated American audiences during the Great Depression.

The women fascinated people with their glamorous lifestyle marked by wealth, privilege, country houses, designer clothes, yachts, luxury apartments and six prestigious marriages.

Interesting Life: Barbara (

Interesting Life: Barbara (“Babe”) Paley with her second husband, CBS founder William S. Paley, at Sarah Roosevelt’s going away party at Greentree, held on Jock Whitney’s Manhasset estate, Long Island, circa 1952

The first groom was 21-year-old Betsey, the younger sister who caught the affection of James Roosevelt II. James, also known as “Jimmy” to his Harvard classmates, was the eldest son of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Betsey’s time as Roosevelt in Washington D.C. was important to Babe as she arranged for her teenage sister to be introduced to the debutante circuit by hosting a ball at the White House.

Babe (née Barbara) had long been considered the most beautiful of the three daughters; she was tall, slim, elegant, and had an aristocratic appeal. But much to her mother’s disappointment, Babe decided to enter the workforce after two seasons of resounding success as a debutante.

Babe became editor of Vogue Magazine, hired by Conde Nast himself, and quickly became a style icon, after believing she had started two 20th century trends – mixing high and low pieces and tying a scarf to her handbag.

She was married to oil heir Stanley Grafton Mortimer for six years, having two children, Amanda Jay Mortimer and Stanley Grafton Mortimer, before marrying CBS founder William S. Paley.

Motherhood was not Babe’s forte and she reportedly ignored her children as she sought social status.

Inspiration: Capote's popularity with New York socialites is perhaps unsurprising given that he was hailed as one of the most cutting-edge writers of the 20th century.

Inspiration: Capote’s popularity with New York socialites is perhaps unsurprising given that he was hailed as one of the most cutting-edge writers of the 20th century.

Babe and William lived in a luxurious apartment in the St Regis in New York. On weekends, they threw lavish parties at their 80-acre farm on Long Island, with celebrity guests in attendance.

She maintained her position on the Best Dressed list 14 times before being officially inducted into the Fashion Hall of Fame in 1958. She remained married to William until his death in 1978 from lung cancer.

One of Babe’s closest friends was Truman Capote, who admitted in his diary that his only flaw was being perfect.

However, this friendship was destroyed after Capote published his Answered Prayers chapter, “La Cote Basque 1965”, in Esquire Magazine – detailing a thinly veiled account of William Paley cheating on his wife.

He said Babe came upon her husband washing their sheets after a woman he was having an affair with got her period on their marital bed. She never spoke to the writer again.